An affiliate of the Georgia Institute of Technology, the Global Center for Medical Innovation (GCMI) helps verify, validate and accelerate commercialization of new medical technologies that save lives and improve patient care. From our Northyards and 14th Street facilities in midtown Atlanta, we help find the finish line for medtech innovations at any point on the pathway from bench to bedside.

Additionally, GCMI and T3 Labs proudly support BME Capstone teams with our medtech design, development and preclinical testing resources including facilities, staff, materials and know-how.

Principal investigators, faculty and student projects served include: Dr. Andres Garcia, Dr. Scott Hollister, Dr. Omer Inan, the Coulter Foundation, over 20 additional GT faculty members and dozens of BME Capstone teams.

This archive details just how we do that and to what effect.

Improving the Human Condition Through Medtech Innovation

GCMI recently welcomed Georgia Tech President Angel Cabrera for an inside look at our work and its impact. Almost immediately after Angel Cabrera was named President of Georgia Tech in 2019, he led “more than 5,700 members of the Georgia Tech community [who] contributed to a new 10-year strategic plan that launched in November 2020.…

2024: The Year of the Atlanta Healthcare Startup? Count Us In!

Fact: Atlanta enjoys assets critical to medtech innovation on par with those in hubs like Boston and the Bay Area. In abundance Atlanta has clinicians, hospitals, patients, universities including two medical schools, engineers, entrepreneurs, solutions providers and supporting state and municipal resources. We are also home for the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention.   …

GCMI Remains Your Resource for Capital Efficient Medtech Design and Development

Medtech and life science innovation is intensely rigorous. It requires high levels of acumen and proficiency in multiple disciplines. It can also be immensely capital intensive.    Tiffany Wilson founded Atlanta’s Global Center for Medical Innovation (GCMI) in 2012 to help medtech innovators de-risk their technologies, increasing their odds of successful commercialization and positive patient…

What’s an “expanded use pathway” and what are its implications for new pediatric technologies?

New medical technologies for pediatric care face difficult hurdles to commercialization, especially industry investment, due to relatively small market size and the quickly shifting nature of pediatric anatomy. In many cases, compassionate or “expanded use” regulatory pathways are needed to make new technologies available for clinical use in pediatric patients.   In December, GCMI Research…

Venture Funding for New, “University Bred” Medical Technologies: When It’s Time and What to Bring

If you’ve been following our funding series for innovators seeking to spin out new medical technologies from higher ed “environments” like Georgia Tech, you’ll have seen:   The Top 5 Medtech and Life Science Funding Resources for GT Faculty, Researchers and Investigators – at Phase Zero, THE Place to Start, and Follow-On, for University Sourced…

The GCMI 2023 State of Medtech Design and Development Report Part 2

In part 1 of our 2023 State of Medtech Design and Development Report we discussed sensors, AI and the paradigm shift in regulatory strategy.   Here in part 2, we dive into a persistent need for gap analysis, the importance of focusing on the unmet clinical need, the challenges of manufacturing at scale and investigate…

What to Do, Where to Go and Why for Newly Funded University-Based New Medical Technologies

You’re a university-based researcher, investigator, faculty member or perhaps even a student who has snagged your first funding for the earliest stage commercialization, design and development activities for your potential medical technology. You might even have completed the first activities with that funding and scored $100,000 or more in follow-on funding from GRA, SBIR, or…

The GCMI 2023 State of Medtech Design and Development Report: Part 1

Innovation in medical technologies is something of a paradox. On one hand, new technologies that drive innovation can manifest at breakneck speed. On the other hand, the pace at which those technologies breed innovations that reach full commercialization and patient impact can be glacial by comparison.   What have been the most significant changes with…

THE Place to Start, And Follow-On, For University-Sourced Medtech Innovation Funding

A dive into the Georgia Research Alliance (GRA) and its funding programs with GRA VP of Venture Development Ashley Cornelison In the first of this short series on medtech innovation funding opportunities, GCMI Director of Scientific Affairs Evan Goldberg stated, “GRA is the first place to go for those trying to commercialize a technology out…

The Top Five Medtech and Life Science Funding Sources for GT Faculty, Researchers, Investigators – AT PHASE ZERO

Atlanta is a burgeoning center of medtech and life science innovation. Georgia Tech faculty, researchers and students are measurable contributors to that ecosystem.   Medtech innovation and the commercialization that creates real impact in provision of care, improved outcomes and value is replete with requirements and pitfalls that can doom ideas and technologies with high…