The Global Center for Medical Innovation (GCMI) helps verify, validate and accelerate the development and commercialization of new medical technologies that save lives and improve patient care. From our 14th Street facilities adjacent to Georgia Tech in midtown Atlanta, we accelerate medtech commercialization at any point on the pathway from bench to bedside.

GCMI supports medical technology innovators at every step on the commercialization pathway including:

Clinical Needs Identification & Market analysis
IP landscape & Freedom to Operate
Prototyping & 3D printing
FMEA analysis & risk mitigation activities
Verification and validation testing
Regulatory submission management
Manufacturing transfer

Have a clinical partner?

Rigors increase in intensity based on predicate technologies or devices and the relative invasive nature of their use, adjacent to, in contact with, or invasive within the patient.

What we're working on

 

Take a look at a few of your GT peers working with GCMI.

Our history

More than two decades and hundreds of preclinical studies completed, GCMI remains an industry leader in medtech design, development, preclinical testing and bioskills training programs.

Funding support

GCMI has dedicated, annual funding for medtech innovation at Georgia Tech, specifically for projects we believe have high potential for successful commercialization.

Who We Help and How

We help individual clinician innovators, start up companies, engineers and scientists with university supported technologies, large and small medical technology customers including industry partners and health systems. Because medtech innovation is endlessly more rigorous than other types of new technology commercialization or advancement, our milestone driven process helps ensure our customers’ ideas achieve a capital efficient path to market from IP, market assessment, design, prototyping, testing and training.

GT Researchers and Faculty Working with GCMI

 

 

 

Scott Hollister, Patsy and Alan Dorris Endowed Chair in Pediatric Technology, Professor, BME

Hollister and his team of biomedical engineers collaborated with the Global Center for Medical Innovation (GCMI) so that GCMI and Children's Healthcare of Atlanta on Georgia's first 3D printed tracheal implant in a pediatric patient.

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Omer Inan, Linda J. and Mark C. Smith Chair and Associate Professor, ECE

After an IV needle has been inserted into a vein, there are various factors that can cause it to leak, either just beneath the skin or even deeper, into surrounding tissues. This painful process of unintended leakage is called infiltration.

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W. Hong Yeo, Associate Professor, Woodruff Faculty Fellow

Currently available digital stethoscopes are durable but expensive, bulky and heavy for pediatrics, not capable of continuously monitoring sounds and subject to cross contamination. Dr. Yeo'S wireless flexible technology flips the script.

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Select Georgia Tech / GCMI Collaborations

More from our Georgia Tech news and features category, including Capstone Design course spotlights in which “Students work in teams to design, build, and test prototypes with real world applications.” GCMI has proudly supported Capstone Design teams since 2018.

From Phase Zero to Full on Sales Mode: GCMI Continues to Proudly Support Jackson Medical’s Mission to Eliminate “Never Events” in the OR

Prologue – Eliminating a Surgical Never Event that Should not Exist Surgical instruments that emit high-intensity light coupled with human error are a leading cause of intraoperative fires and patient burns. The healthcare system refers to incidents like these as “never events” so they should never happen, right? But, survey results published in the Joint…

Improving the Human Condition Through Medtech Innovation

GCMI recently welcomed Georgia Tech President Angel Cabrera for an inside look at our work and its impact. Almost immediately after Angel Cabrera was named President of Georgia Tech in 2019, he led “more than 5,700 members of the Georgia Tech community [who] contributed to a new 10-year strategic plan that launched in November 2020.…

2024: The Year of the Atlanta Healthcare Startup? Count Us In!

Fact: Atlanta enjoys assets critical to medtech innovation on par with those in hubs like Boston and the Bay Area. In abundance Atlanta has clinicians, hospitals, patients, universities including two medical schools, engineers, entrepreneurs, solutions providers and supporting state and municipal resources. We are also home for the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention.   …

GCMI Remains Your Resource for Capital Efficient Medtech Design and Development

Medtech and life science innovation is intensely rigorous. It requires high levels of acumen and proficiency in multiple disciplines. It can also be immensely capital intensive.    Tiffany Wilson founded Atlanta’s Global Center for Medical Innovation (GCMI) in 2012 to help medtech innovators de-risk their technologies, increasing their odds of successful commercialization and positive patient…

What’s an “expanded use pathway” and what are its implications for new pediatric technologies?

New medical technologies for pediatric care face difficult hurdles to commercialization, especially industry investment, due to relatively small market size and the quickly shifting nature of pediatric anatomy. In many cases, compassionate or “expanded use” regulatory pathways are needed to make new technologies available for clinical use in pediatric patients.   In December, GCMI Research…

Venture Funding for New, “University Bred” Medical Technologies: When It’s Time and What to Bring

If you’ve been following our funding series for innovators seeking to spin out new medical technologies from higher ed “environments” like Georgia Tech, you’ll have seen:   The Top 5 Medtech and Life Science Funding Resources for GT Faculty, Researchers and Investigators – at Phase Zero, THE Place to Start, and Follow-On, for University Sourced…

GCMI’s History

In the late 1990s, Dr. Robert Matheny, Chief Scientific Officer of CorMatrix Cardiovascular Inc., was looking for accessible resources, including preclinical support, needed to support innovation in care for cardiovascular physicians and their patients.

In 1999, his collaboration with other Atlanta area interventional cardiologists and cardiothoracic surgeons resulted in the development of a preclinical CRO called American Cardiovascular Research Institute which later became Translational Testing and Training Laboratories, Inc. or T3 Labs.

GCMI was founded in 2012 by Tiffany Wilson, now CEO of the Philadelphia Science Center. In 2016 GCMI became a Georgia Tech affiliate and acquired responsibility for T3 Labs making GCMI an end-to-end medtech innovation center.

More than two decades and hundreds of preclinical studies completed, GCMI remains an industry leader in medtech design, development, preclinical testing and bioskills training programs. We have helped more than 50 new medical technologies achieve regulatory approval.

Sherry Farrugia, who most recently served as executive director of Georgia Tech Pediatric Technologies, now serves as CEO of GCMI. She is the 2023 recipient of the Global Center for Health Innovation’s highest honor, the Industry Growth Award.

On Funding and Clinical Partners

 

We've got some funding for promising medical technologies.

GCMI has dedicated, annual funding for medtech innovation at Georgia Tech, specifically for projects we believe have high potential for successful commercialization, follow-on funding and improved patient outcomes. Funded projects are selected by GCMI leadership inclusive of consultation with the board of directors. 

Learn more.

 

You've found a clinical partner. Now what?

New medical technologies are subject to the significant, necessary rigors applied by regulatory bodies and, ultimately, market forces. Those rigors increase in intensity based on predicate technologies or devices and the relative invasive nature of their use, adjacent to, in contact with, or invasive within the patient.

Learn more.

Get in touch. It's never too early.

If you want to know more about medtech innovation at Georgia Tech including who we are, what we do and how we do it, contact GCMI Director of Scientific Affairs Evan Goldberg via email evan.goldberg@t3labs.org.

More To Know

 

 

Phase Zero: The place to start for your new medical technology or idea.

 

Doing the right things early and following a rigorous phase gated process can substantially increase the likelihood of milestone achievement at any point in a technology’s commercialization pathway. 

Learn more.